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steveinaspeedo:

(via)
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4gifs:

[video]
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(Source: steveinaspeedo)

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(Source: inspride)

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colchrishadfield:

Space Tacos - tortillas are used to replace bread on Station, and can last a year, thanks to the scientists at Taco Bell: http://www.cnet.com/news/houston-we-have-a-tortilla-problem/

Here’s what it’s like to make a sandwich in weightlessness, using one of those floating, ageless, tasty tortillas.

Tacos kedd

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thehandmadecyclist:

We’ve got together with the good folk of Soigneur.nl and Look Mum No Hands to put up a large scale version of our Tour de France print at the Old Street cafe in London. The print was originally designed for the cover of Soigneur’s June issue.

If you are passing through Old Street, stop by and spot the stories from Tours old and new.

Limited edition copies of the print are available now to purchase at thehandmadecyclist.com

(via apisonadora60)

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(Source: ForGIFs.com, via 4gifs)

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maddieonthings:

Maddie got some new kicks

maddieonthings:

Maddie got some new kicks

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(Source: steveinaspeedo)

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fuzzyimages:

4gifs:

Boop

oop. sorry!

fuzzyimages:

4gifs:

Boop

oop. sorry!

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via generalbikestore)

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txchnologist:

This is what happens when someone brings a football to NASA.

The folks at the agency’s Ames Research Center decided to take a closer look at the new ball that was designed for this year’s World Cup. The result is a lesson in fluid dynamics.

Get ready for this Sunday’s final match by reading all about how air flows around the ball here. Then annoy your friends with the scientific reason why this year’s ball has a smoother flight path than the one used during the last World Cup. Spoiler alert: Longer, deeper seams this year mean more disruption to the airflow around the ball and a smaller low-pressure wake behind it after it’s kicked.

This smaller wake leads to less “knuckling,” the erratic dipping and veering of the ball when it reaches the average professional kicking speed of around 50 mph.

“There is a thin layer of air that forms near the ball’s surface called the boundary layer and it is the state and behavior of that layer that is critical to the performance of the ball,” said Rabi Mehta, chief of Ames’s Experimental Aero-Physics Branch. “The materials used, the ball’s surface roughness and its distribution determines its aerodynamics.”

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maddieonthings:

Ron the Swan ☀️

maddieonthings:

Ron the Swan ☀️

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threadless:

Shedding light on how the water gets inside the melon, “Water Melon" by Jaco Haasbroek is one of this week’s newest designs!
Shop this week’s new tees!

threadless:

Shedding light on how the water gets inside the melon, “Water Melon" by Jaco Haasbroek is one of this week’s newest designs!

Shop this week’s new tees!